7 WAYS TO GET OUT EVERYDAY

How often do you actu­ally get out­side? In the win­ter, it’s easy to skip a few days and blame it on the cold, the bad snow con­di­tions, or the lack of climbable ice. But now that the weather is warm and the trails have thawed, there are fewer excuses for not get­ting out­side. If the warm weather isn’t enough to entice you, here are some tips to ensure you’re get­ting a daily dose of the outdoors.

MON­DAY
Start the week by cre­at­ing a work­out sched­ule, includ­ing the time and length of each work­out. It can be help­ful to have a goal for each work­out, even if the goal is to just get out­side for a half an hour. Hav­ing a solid plan makes it eas­ier to fol­low through when you’re los­ing moti­va­tion or if the weather gets bad.

TUES­DAY
Some peo­ple thrive on doing the same activ­ity every­day, like surf­ing or run­ning, but the rep­e­ti­tion can have neg­a­tive impacts on your body, as well as on your mind. If you find your­self dread­ing another lunchtime run or that non-so-new climb­ing project has you avoid­ing your har­ness, con­sider switch­ing things up with a dif­fer­ent sport. Rent or bor­row a bike (and a hel­met), lace up your sneak­ers and go for a run, or trade your skis for a snowboard.

WEDNES­DAY
Some­times, the weather sucks. No mat­ter how techy your lay­ers are, the thought of going out in the rain, sleet, hail, or grau­pel can be unap­peal­ing. Bad weather is one of the biggest hur­dles to get­ting out­side, but it can also be the most reward­ing time to leave the house, for these three rea­sons: there are usu­ally fewer peo­ple around, the land­scape looks com­pletely dif­fer­ent dur­ing a storm, and think of how hard-core you’ll feel when you’re done.

THURS­DAY
Unless you’re train­ing for a spe­cific race or an espe­cially gru­el­ing event, there’s no need to push your­self every­day. Just get­ting out for a short walk means you’re get­ting more exer­cise than the aver­age Amer­i­can, so grab some shoes and walk out the door. Seri­ously, that’s all you have to do. Bonus points for bring­ing along a dog, a child, or a friend.

FRI­DAY
If you’re burnt out by the same set of sin­gle­track or a crag that only offers crack climb­ing or that 5-mile run that begins and ends at your office, look for a new chal­lenge in a new area. Some­times a sim­ple trick like run­ning the loop in reverse will shake the bore­dom, but don’t be afraid of doing some­thing more dras­tic, like search­ing out new track or an unclimbed boul­der. Another easy change if you’re a cyclist or a run­ner is switch­ing from the road to trails (or vice versa). The new scenery will be refresh­ing and the sur­face change will keep your mind active.

SAT­UR­DAY
It’s easy to cre­ate a sim­ple excuse and can­cel on your­self, but are you really going to call up your part­ner and say you can’t meet them because it’s too cold, it’s too wet, or because you’re just not feel­ing it? Of course not. If you’re strug­gling to keep your­self account­able, plan to work­out with a friend. It’s harder to get out of a com­mit­ment, which means you’ll be more likely to fol­low through. Be sure to hold your part­ner to account­able, too. If they try to back out with some lame excuse, you’ll be more likely to bail the next time because you know it’ll be easy to make up an excuse.

SUN­DAY
Step 1. Watch this film
Step 2. Turn off your com­puter, tablet, phone, car­rier pigeon, etc.
Step 3. Go for it

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